Muscle & Joint Health

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Muscle & Joint Health

Many of us are affected by experiencing pain in the muscles and joints, and it can be caused by a number of different factors. It’s often a result of joint inflammation (such as arthritis) and infection. It is advised, though, to see your GP when you experience a steadily increased pain, as this could be a sign of osteoarthritis. Let’s have a look at some of the causes of muscle and joint pain are, along with some self-help tips you can try to relieve your pain.

Causes & conditions of muscle pain

When talking about muscle pain we refer to pain and stiffness from exercise and muscle strains as ‘normal’ muscle pain, as this is experienced more regularly by a lot of people. Especially people who go to the gym often and do strenuous exercise suffer from this type of muscle pain. Additionally, ‘systematic’ muscle pain can be caused by fibromyalgia, viral infections or rheumatoid arthritis. For the latter, small joints in the hands and feet.

The most important thing before you do any exercise that might lead to sore muscles, is to stretch it out. Take your time to warm up your muscles with a combination of dynamic and static stretches. Fortunately, we also stock a range of products that are very helpful in relieving this pain. Fisiocrem for example, is a natural pain relief gel that can be applied to the area of pain and soothes the contracted muscle areas. Moreover, you can add our Nutriplex to your breakfast routine by mixing it in smoothies or even adding it to your oatmeal.

Causes & conditions of joint pain

Joint pain is extremely common, about one-third have said to experience joint pain regularly. Nearly 9 million people in the UK have sought treatment for this condition. Other causes of joint pain include broken bones, fibromyalgia and repetitive movement. Injury-related swelling can easily be managed at home by taking anti-inflammatories and making sure set enough time aside to rest well.

Joint pain is often found in the knee joint, as it takes the full weight of the body it is notably more vulnerable. As you get older though, the areas that are affected by joint pain can range from your shoulders to your hips and from your ankles to your hands. Also, (osteo)arthritis is an incurable long-term condition which means that it is important to talk to your GP about the best ways to cope with the condition and its reduced mobility. Complete prevention of this condition is not possible, however you are able to minimise the risk of developing it. The three key factors in minimising that risk:

Exercise regularly

You should avoid any exercise that increases the risk of getting an injury, but a moderate-intensity activity such as cycling or a brisk walk around the neighbourhood are perfect to build up your muscle strength.

Keep your posture in check

Paying attention to your posture can not only relief your joint pain – it also helps to alleviate muscle tension in your back. Besides making sure your shoulders are kept back and relaxed at all times, you can adjust your (office) chair so that you’re not hunched over your keyboard.

Mind your diet

Carrying around extra weight can put unnecessary strain on your joints. Additionally, being overweight can also increase the speed of bone degeneration. It is advised to try and lose about 5-10 percent of your total body weight, it can subsequently be reviewed whether your symptoms improve or worsen over time.

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